Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Just played around

Working on a perfume and perfectionice it takes a lot of work and time, and sometimes it's better to take a break and start working on it with new energy. So sometimes I like to just play around with my materials without any goal just play with them and see if I can find nice combinations. It's real fun to work like that and give the opportunity to find interesting accords. Today I just played with my materials as well and started with one of my favorite materials: Galbanum a wonderful green material. I added some other green and leafy notes and some fresh notes. An interesting material with a galbanum note is Pharaone, the first time I smelled this material it wasn't nice at all, well I still don't find the smell nice but because of that I was getting interested in the material, it's described as having a galbanum/pineapple/angelica note. I diluted the material way down but it still was bad, so I tried the Pharaone in the Galbanum to see how it would smell in a blend. And the result is real nice.... it lifted the fragrance and gave it a fruity note. That's the strange thing about perfumery, you can't judge a fragrance material without working with it, and see how it reacts with other materials.

7 comments:

FrankieCee said...

Hi Jenny, funny you should mention about not prejudging a chemical until you see how it reacts in formula because that's exactly how I feel about Javanol. I think it is much too expensive and totally overrated but, I have not yet tried it in a composition so I may be 180* off on this one. I guess I'll reserve final judgement on it until I've seen just how it performs. I like your idea about just "playing around" with no particular goal in sight. I'll bet a lot of famous perfumes were discovered in just that method. Ciao, Frank

Jenny said...

Hi Frank,
An expensive material doesn't mean it's a good material, the price can be high just because it's difficult to make. I experimented with the Javanol and I do like it, the only way to find out its potential is by making the same formula and changing the material by an other simular product to smell the difference.

Remember the story about Hedione? It doesn't have a powerful odor it's rather weak. It wasn't a new material but after Edmond Routnitska used it in his Eau Savage it became one of the most important materials. The power of Hedione only shows when used in other materials.

It's good to playing around and use materials in an unusual way to find out their potential.

Good luck with your experiments on Javanol and keep me informed.

FrankieCee said...

Thanks Jenny, I shall do just that. Incidentally, I happen to find Hedione a terrific, soft floral note with substantial tenacity. I have a specific intentions for that one. As far as the Javanol is concerned, I'll take your word for it, seeing as how you have used it already. So, I guess its greatest attributes aren't apparent until it is used in blend. Now I'm curious, lol. Thanks, Frank

chaya ruchama said...

How delightful...
I'm a galbanum fan, myself.

Francois Coty "fooled around" a lot- and you know how far he went !

Hope all is well with you, and DH...

Dikke kus !

Jenny said...

Hi Frank,
Well let me know how the experiments with the Javavonl went. In what kind of fragrance are you using Hedione?

Jenny said...

Hi Chaya,
Galbanum is wonderful, most of the perfumes I like contain galbanum.
I'm real fine and happy fooling around with perfume making, hope you're fine to.

Dikke kus terug.

FrankieCee said...

Hahaha, I'll tell you exactly where I'm gonna use the Hedione, in my Chypre #8 formula, the one I've been telling you about since I joined up. I've recently had an inspiration to include it into the heart accord of that formula. I believe it was first used as a Jasmine replacement and I can smell the Jasmine note in it for sure, only it is lighter and more lively than the absolute. I am hoping it adds a "sparkle" to the heart accord. Then it will be closer to completion, with a few more adjustments. I am quite hopeful. I'll let you know. Ciao, Frank