Thursday, October 19, 2006

Galbanum and apricot




Because I liked the result of the experiment with galbanum I decided to continue with this experiment. To accentuate the green note of galbanum I used cis-3-Hexenyl Methyl Carbonate that gives a nice green violet leaf scent. A nice and often used combination with galbanum is hyacinth so I added that as well and some light rosy and lily notes. To give the perfume fixation I added some green woody base notes like a little oakmoss absolute unfortunately it's only allowed by IFRA (International Fragrance Association) to use a little so I used some substitutes as well and vetiver which has a incredible nice green woody asparagus kind of scent in combination with vertofix coeur that has a vetiver scent in combination with a leather note and finally some cedar and cedryl acetate to enhance the woody notes. Okay the perfume was nice in this stadium but just nice, I call that a safe smelling perfume, nice but simple with no surprises.

I smelled the perfume on a smelling strip and on my skin to study the result and thinking about what was missing. The process is all in my head, I think about notes that I can use and imagine how this note would smell in combination with this perfume. I liked the green fresh note but liked it to be more full bodied and warm, and there it was.... it needed a warm fruity note I chose the note of apricot a warm fruity full bodied note and added quite a bit together with some cinnamon and a touch of vanilla. To give the perfume some warm softness I added a wonderful orchid note and some narcissus because beside the flowery notes it has some fruity aspects as well. The result is a green fruity warm perfume with a soft feeling, I keep you informed about the experiments with this perfume.

8 comments:

chaya ruchama said...

OOhh-apricot !

I must confess, many of the commercial perfumes bore me with their repetitive, unimaginative use of fruit...
But this one sounds very promising, and luscious.

Let us know how the story ends, on this one...

P.S.- Don't you have a birthday coming up soon, meisje ?

Jenny said...

Hi Chaya,

He he, yes my birthday is coming up soon, how did you know?

I know what you mean about all the fruity perfumes, I do like fruity notes but sometimes they are just to girly and don't have any depth. In this case it adds more of a sundried warm apricot scent what makes the perfume warmer.

Kus!

FrankieCee said...

Well Jenny, you had better let us know when your Birthday is so we may all rejoice with you by offering our own glad tidings, lol. I would like to know where you got your "apricot" notes from? A synthetic is the only logical source which comes to my mind. So, I know where "peach" comes from, where does apricot? Ciao, Frank

Jenny said...

Hi Frank,
My birthday? When you look at my profile you will know.....
The apricot is my little secret I made it with different aroma chemicals, I'm not going to reveal them all but one of the materials I used is Nectaryl from Givaudan.

FrankieCee said...

Well then Jenny, you better "patent" the formula, maybe you will find great success in marketing it. How long did it take you to perfect it? How close to apricot does it smell? I told you that you were an enigma, lol.

Jenny said...

Hi Frank,
I always work separate on bases like fruity bases like apple, apricot or musky bases or a rose base a leather base etc. because sometimes I'm looking for a special note and I like to use them but also because I want to learn from it. You should try it as well, you will learn a lot from it. Working on a base is different than working on a perfume because you will work on one particulair note and learn how say a flower or a fruity note is build up.
But sometimes I only use one aspect of a note in my perfumes, let's say I want a rose note but just a hint of rose than I can use only Phenylethyl alcohol for example. When you worked on bases you will learn what kind of notes you need to get some kind of effect. Sometimes when working on a perfume you get a certain note lets say a white chocolate note and you don't know where it's coming from, you didn't put a white chocolate note in it, it could come from linalool and vanilla.

FrankieCee said...

That's a very interesting concept Jenny. Well since I now have the raw materials, I 'can' do things like that now. It's just so overwhelming seeing as how there are SO many chemicals out here, to choose from. Let me ask you this, when you build a particular 'base', do you keep it isolated and then use it whenever you are looking for a particular nuance in a composition? Next, when you are working on a composition do you build your accords separately then add them all together or work from the base, up, in the same receptacle. I know of people that use each method. I wish I had more time to delve into some of these experiments.

Jenny said...

Hi Frank,
First I make the accord of the perfume strong balanced, I need to find the perfect balance between the notes. That are just say 7 notes when the balance is right I start to build around that accord.
Sometimes I use a separately made base when I'm looking for a particular note but I don't put them all together to build up a perfume.